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TexasMadness Profile
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Suppli al Telefono


Back to Rome for another great meal. A few days ago I made a dinner using farm veggies and included some of the risotto from the same recipe I made here earlier. I made sure to have extra so we would have enough for the recipe tonight!

Suppli al telefono is basically just a ball of battered, deep fried risotto stuffed with cheese. And it was delicious!

Very easy to make, just mix 2 eggs with 2 cups of any leftover risotto. Form a ball of about 1 tablespoon of the mixture around a 1/2" cube of cheese like mozzarella or Monterrey Jack. Roll in bread crumbs and fry it up!

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And this is the reason it's called 'al telefono' - telephone cords hanging from the suppli when you pull them apart. emoticon

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We will certainly be making this one again when we have leftover risotto.
2/18/2012, 2:09 am Link to this post Send Email to TexasMadness   Send PM to TexasMadness
 
Firlefanz Profile
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Re: Foods of the World: Italy


That looks delicious!

 emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon

---
- Firlefanz

Mystical Adventures
Hannah Steenbock
The Pagan Porch
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Re: Foods of the World: Italy


that looks really good! I showed DH the photo of the calzone and he wants me to definitely give that one a go!!

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"Do unto others as you would have them do unto you"
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TexasMadness Profile
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Ravioli


Phew, our last pasta dish! Ravioli is common enough not only all over Italy now, but also outside of the country. This particular recipe comes from the area thought to have invented the dish - the Ligurian coast, home of the famous seaport of Genoa.

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Legend has it that ravioli was invented as a way for sailors to make the most of out all foodstuffs on a long voyage. All leftovers would be chopped up, stuffed into envelopes of dough and served the next day.

This particular ravioli was a simple cheese variety - ricotta and parmesan with egg yolks as a binder. Our duck eggs made the filling garishly orange! emoticon

I've made ravioli before and even have a neat "ravioli maker" (a metal form with a plastic top to press two sheets of dough together, one having had scoops of stuffing laid on it). I used the same pasta recipe as before but after the pizza dough mixing in the stand mixer, I attempted that. Turns out, our hands must be dry and sap some of the moisture from the dough because following the same recipe but using the mixer yielded a silky but very gummy dough. It proved impossible to use the ravioli maker, so I did it all by just eye balling spacing and cutting the pieces apart with a pizza cutter. Sure, some of the raviolis were a bit misshapen, but most of them looked great!

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The dough was so difficult to handle, that it took all three of us - yes Willa too! - to get the project done. Evidence of Willa's helping can be seen in her play kitchen located just next to the counter where hubby and I usually do pasta making.

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We served the ravioli with a tomato basil sauce, a side of roasted carrots and parsnips with rosemary and parsley, and a small salad.

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It was simply delicious! Hubby said it was the best ravioli he's had in a long time. The dough made the project fussy, but if we used a hand-kneaded dough, these would not even take that long or be that hard to make. Definitely on our list again!

Oh, and best of [sign in to see URL] recipe used just egg yolks, so I had 3 egg whites left over. Just before putting the bowl of egg whites down for the dog, I thought I would look at what goes into making meringue cookies - something I've never done before. They are incredibly easy! So we also got a batch of cookies out of the meal!

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Local ingredients:
    eggs
    carrots
    parsnips
    tomatoes
    herbs
    salad
2/21/2012, 1:50 am Link to this post Send Email to TexasMadness   Send PM to TexasMadness
 
Saijen SilverWolf1 Profile
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Re: Foods of the World: Italy


Looks and sounds really good!!!!! I love that Willa helped with the dough! She's not just a cutie, she's a helpful cutie!!!!!!!

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"Do unto others as you would have them do unto you"
~~@Saijen@~~
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TexasMadness Profile
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Fonduta and Stracciatella


We return to the Piedmont region - the most mountainous place in Italy - for our next dish. The region is home to Mount Font which lends its name to fontina cheese. Traditional fontina is a very exacting food - the breed of cow is important, the cheese making process one of the most detailed and the temperatures must be carefully controlled. Finally, the cheese must be ages in caves of stone and lime at a height of nearly 10,000 feet. Sounds like a recipe for success to me!

We went this weekend to our local cheese shop to get the real [sign in to see URL] they didn't have any! They carry different cheeses all the time so you never know what will be there but I really had my fingers crossed for some authentic fontina. But we had to settle for whatever they carried at the grocery store. It's not as good as stuff I've had from the cheese shop, but it's still a tasty cheese.

Anyway, it's the base of a dish called fonduta, closely related to the more familiar Swiss version called fondue. Additionally we had a simple soup called stracciatella.

The fonduta differs from fondue in that it's not just melted cheese but has cornstarch, milk and egg yolks in it. It should also be served with paper thin slices of white [sign in to see URL] ingredient we were at a loss to find! Ah well, it worked with out it!

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The recipe is simple, just melt the cheese with the milk and cornstarch and then temper the egg yolk before adding it to the mix. I'd never done egg tempering before and was a little nervous I'd screw something up, but it was easy! In just a few short minutes, we had a rich creamy mixture in which to dip our homemade foccacia!

The soup was another simple recipe, using almost identical ingredients to the zuppa alla pavese (poached egg on fried bread in broth) that we loved so much. This time the egg is mixed with the cheese and parsley and slowly stirred into the boiling broth so that it breaks into little flakes.

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Not to be completely without any vegetable for our meal, I made a blood orange, turnip and arugula salad to go with the meal.

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Everything was delicious! The fonduta was so creamy and the perfect dip for the bread. We also dipped the bread in the soup. I do think I preferred the poached egg soup simply because I love a thick runny yolk. And the salad was the perfect complement of spicy and sweet to go with all the rich flavors of the other dishes. We will certainly make the fonduta [sign in to see URL] with traditional fontina next time!

We only have one meal left for our Italian adventure. Unfortunately, it calls for spinach and we are waiting for the next spinach crop at the farm. So we will likely be moving on to our next adventure before this one is completely wrapped up!

Local ingredients:
    eggs
    parsley
    milk
    arugula
    turnips
2/22/2012, 1:51 am Link to this post Send Email to TexasMadness   Send PM to TexasMadness
 
Saijen SilverWolf1 Profile
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Re: Foods of the World: Italy


Looks really [sign in to see URL] like a bit of work, though. But [sign in to see URL] of these do LOL...

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"Do unto others as you would have them do unto you"
~~@Saijen@~~
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