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Queenyforever Profile
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Re: Pacific and Southeast Asian Cooking


Oh that does look delicious! emoticon

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✴ Birthplace: Earth ✴ Race: Human ✴ Politics: Freedom ✴ Religion: Love♥

3/2/2012, 6:23 pm Link to this post Send Email to Queenyforever   Send PM to Queenyforever Blog
 
Saijen SilverWolf1 Profile
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Re: Pacific and Southeast Asian Cooking


The paste looks really good. I like putting curry into acorn squash soup, and using coconut milk instead of water or milk. Talk about good stuff!!!!



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Rebecca Wraenna Profile
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Re: Pacific and Southeast Asian Cooking


Yum! That looks really good!
I actually made something similar yesterday- Light coconut milk, Thai red curry paste, tofu and veggies. Served with bean cakes, which didn't necessarily go with it but were tasty.
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TexasMadness Profile
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Re: Pacific and Southeast Asian Cooking


Saijen, do you mean curry powder? I've learned that there are SO many things called 'curry'. There is an herb called curry leaf which tastes nothing like the yellowish spice mixture called curry powder, which again is somewhat different than the wet (and SPICY) mixture called curry paste!

We made a second Thai curry tonight. I had actually planned on making these on the same night but last night we had no leftovers and had to do something! The yellow beef curry took almost twice as long to make, so I just opted for the tofu curry last night. So tonight - yellow beef curry!

It used the same curry paste we made last night and followed nearly the same directions - reducing the coconut milk so the oil separated, adding the spices and other ingredients, but this had a long simmer of 45 minutes at the end to cook the beef and potatoes.

The ingredients:

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Beef, potatoes, onions, coconut milk and spices. This one had more spices - turmeric (thus the name *yellow* curry) star anise, cinnamon and bay leaves. After about an hour and half, we had our delicious Thai meal!

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I liked the additional ingredients of onions and potatoes. The sauce was more subtle though. We had to skimp on the curry paste because the original recipe didn't make as much as it said. So instead of 2 tablespoons, this probably got [sign in to see URL]. That stuff is so strong, the missing 1/4 probably made the difference!

I didn't like the beef. It was tough and chewy. It was a cut called 'seven steaks'. I'd like to try this again with the cut we used for the kalio - tri-tips - or maybe even some tofu.

Still, it was a delicious meal. Very hearty and satisfying!
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Saijen SilverWolf1 Profile
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Re: Pacific and Southeast Asian Cooking


Texas, no, I use a green curry paste I get from an Oriental market in Johnson City. I also get my Hoisin sauce from them. I much prefer the actual curry paste to the curry powder, which does NOTHING.... emoticon

The squash soup was a first course for our Ancestral Dinners every Samhain, and one year we ran out of the curry paste, and tried to add curry powder. Needless to say, the soup was nowhere near as good as usual.

We use the store-bought soup (it's Campbell's and in a box), then use the coconut milk and curry paste. We usually add the paste by 1/8 tsp till we get it as 'warm' as we want it. You can always add, but you can't take it [sign in to see URL]. So, we go slow with it. I do enjoy a good curry!! But, not if it's too hot!

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Rebecca Wraenna Profile
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Re: Pacific and Southeast Asian Cooking


Just a thought on curry powders- have you ever tried any of the Penzey's curry blends? I use their garam masala quite a bit, usually in combination with other spices.
3/5/2012, 6:19 am Link to this post Send Email to Rebecca Wraenna   Send PM to Rebecca Wraenna Blog
 
Saijen SilverWolf1 Profile
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Re: Pacific and Southeast Asian Cooking


Rebecca, not sure I've even heard of [sign in to see URL] good, though!!! May have to look and see if I can find some. I like some good savory spices on some [sign in to see URL] not too hot (tummy can't take really hot stuff)

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TexasMadness Profile
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Re: Pacific and Southeast Asian Cooking


I was actually advised to go to Penzey's to look for some of the harder-to-find spices on my list for these recipes. There's a new shop for them in town. But on the way, I remembered an even closer place that opened up about a year ago and went there (Savory Spice Shop). It was much more "informal" and you could buy small quantities (not sure if you can order small amounts of Penzey's online but in the store you have to buy rather large amounts and I was getting expensive stuff!). I found everything I needed so didn't venture farther!
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Rebecca Wraenna Profile
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Re: Pacific and Southeast Asian Cooking


TexasMadness, you have a Penzey's in your town? I am seriously envious. I used to live near the twin cities (in MN) and there were a few locations in the general area. Now I'm a bit farther away. You can buy small jars of things, but you do save more if you buy in bulk. It would be nice if you could just buy what you needed, like at a co-op.

Saijen, they do have a sweet curry powder that isn't very hot at all. My sister and I are both terribly addicted to Penzey's, and I'm afraid we've gotten our mom hooked, too. emoticon
3/9/2012, 6:41 am Link to this post Send Email to Rebecca Wraenna   Send PM to Rebecca Wraenna Blog
 
TexasMadness Profile
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Re: Pacific and Southeast Asian Cooking


Ack! My post about the big Javanese feast didn't make it! Phooey, time to retype!

My brother, his wife and their kids, 1 and 3, came over this weekend along with my brother-in-law to make a big Javanese/Indonesian meal. It was also a cooking party, so we all pitched in. Lot of fun and Willa had a blast (as usual) with her cousins.

We started with sate (or, as I see it more commonly spelled now - satay). We did chicken, pork and beef. Each one had a different marinade and a different dipping sauce. Hubby and I did all the marinades before everyone got here so everything was set to go. My brother manned the grill and cooked everything perfectly.

The chicken was AWESOME! It's the first chicken dish that I've just really really loved. It was the first to go too! It was served with a peanut sauce, not unlike the ones I've had in restaurants.
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The pork was also very excellent. We brined in beforehand, a technique we are experimenting with to get more a more tender texture which hubby wants. I think it worked perfectly! The pork had a sauce called 'ketjap manis' which is a sweetened soy sauce.

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The beef was braised before being put on the grill, so it was essentially just 'crisped' there. It was good - we probably would have thought it great had it not paled in comparison to the pork and chicken! It had a very strong turmeric coconut milk sauce that it was basted in during grilling.
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The main meal was supposed to consist of a rice platter with 3 side dishes but we were so full after all the sates that we opted for just the rice and the salad side dish. The rice was made entirely with coconut milk instead of water and had a lot of spices - lemon grass, kaffir lime leaves, star anise, bay leaves, turmeric, etc. It was incredibly rich and flavorful. Oh, and it was cooked in the oven - haven't ever cooked rice in the oven before!
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And the salad - called 'asinam'- was really incredible. I didn't think it was going to be all that flavorful - thought it was be bland really. But it was surprisingly good. I think it took everyone a little bit to warm up to the idea since it just looked like a pile of oddly matched raw vegetables at first!
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Starting from the top and going clockwise, shredded cabbage, plain fried tofu, steamed mung bean sprouts, peanuts, radish, fried tofu with wood ear fungus and kimchi (spicy fermented cucumber). It was served with a simple dressing made of vinegar, garlic, ginger and hot chilies. We all mixed and matched the sate sauces with it though. My favorite was half dressing and half ketjap manis. It made for a perfect sweet and spicy sauce.

Excellent meal, great company. All in all a wonderful family night!
3/9/2012, 4:36 pm Link to this post Send Email to TexasMadness   Send PM to TexasMadness
 


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